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snglemama 4 kids; Georgia 11978 posts
Apr 10th '13
Quoting Minion:" I'm watching a TV show on TruTV about violent protests and such. One was of the riot in France in 2006. ... [snip!] ... and b***h about things we don't like, but we never do anything about it. Are we afraid of our government? Are we just lazy?"


neither. we elect our officials. Remember, that while you may not like a law, often they are put into place because others think they are a good idea. You may be surrounded with people who don't agree, but that still doesn't mean the majority agrees with you.



(you in general, not you specifically)

Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting snglemama:</b>" neither. we elect our officials. Remember, that while you may not like a law, often they are put into ... [snip!] ... with people who don't agree, but that still doesn't mean the majority agrees with you. (you in general, not you specifically)"</blockquote>



But what if they make a law that no one likes?

*Mary Moon* 1 child; New York 3606 posts
Apr 10th '13

I think people should definitely work at one of the root causes. We vote and elect people who would suit our needs and advocate for us. We want the best candidate possible for the job. Voting day comes and a third of the people I have in mind don't care and another third don't realize you have to register to vote. The other third just votes willy nilly with no research on said candidate. "I am republican...so I will vote republican". You have to vote for substance, not the party 3 generations of your family have voted for. You can't vote democrat because you are "a democrat". If you wholeheartedly believe that party is okay do it, but don't roll out of bed on election day and vote without even a quick wikipedia search on the candidate because you think you are this party and every candidate nominated for said party will represent you. There is so much media pertaining to elections and so little educating. Voting is the single most hands on thing we can do pertaining to the government yet people refuse to get involved, have no idea how it works, and let others sway them.
I just know too many people that won't get involved with politics, choose to make their statement be that they are passive and don't "do" politics and then then hop on the occupy movement because they want rights. You have the right to vote...start there. Will It make a difference on a small scale? Probably not. On a large scale if voters would research, educate themselves and vote? I think it could.

The Doctor 2 kids; Boulder, CO, United States 60775 posts
Apr 10th '13
Quoting snglemama:" neither. we elect our officials. Remember, that while you may not like a law, often they are put into ... [snip!] ... with people who don't agree, but that still doesn't mean the majority agrees with you. (you in general, not you specifically)"


Yes. We do...



Though, of course, the two party system.... needing mass quantities of money to even think about being in politics... yaknow. All that fun stuff comes to mind, too when this subject comes up.

Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting ⚓ Sarah ⚓:</b>" Because we still have more freedoms than most contries"</blockquote>



How so? Most first world countries have about the same freedoms as us.

Vivialopod 2 kids; Vantaa, Finland 42788 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" I forgot about them. Good on them! If multitudes of people would do this we might see changes."</blockquote>




There's nothing good about it :? The majority of them were just kids getting involved in the current trendy social movement to feel worldly and important, unnecessarily escalating the situation without even fully understanding what they were protesting.

Vivialopod 2 kids; Vantaa, Finland 42788 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting ⚓ Sarah ⚓:</b>" Because we still have more freedoms ... [snip!] ... more freedoms than most contries"</blockquote> How so? Most first world countries have about the same freedoms as us."</blockquote>




The majority of the world isn't made up of first world countries.

snglemama 4 kids; Georgia 11978 posts
Apr 10th '13
Quoting Minion:" <blockquote><b>Quoting snglemama:</b>" neither. we elect our officials. Remember, ... [snip!] ... agrees with you. (you in general, not you specifically)"</blockquote> But what if they make a law that no one likes?"


Then they don't get elected again, and next election someone fixes it.



I haven't seen a law pass that was enough to riot over. I'm glad we dont' have to worry about riots. People get hurt, often innocent people.. not the ones who made the laws anyway. So why?

Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting ⚓ Sarah ⚓:</b>" There arent many first world countries....thats what I was getting at."</blockquote>




Ahhhhh I'm used to being around American elitists lol. I had interpreted it as something like "this is 'Murica. We're better than everybody else." Lol.

NopeNotGonnaDOIt 6 kids; Cuba 3000 posts
Apr 10th '13

Well there are protests going on everyday in North America, none of which get a lot of mainstream press. I would assume that apathy and ignorance would play a role in why there are not more people involved here. Also, aren't there laws now that people who protest their government are considered terrorists?

NopeNotGonnaDOIt 6 kids; Cuba 3000 posts
Apr 10th '13
Quoting ⚓ Sarah ⚓:" It wouldnt surprise me. US citizens can be arrested at any time, held for however long US officials ... [snip!] ... was arrested. Laws like this are getting passed every day but they're placed in with innocent bills so we're none the wiser."


They are implementing loopholes all the time, like by-law P-6. This just happened a couple days ago, everyone got arrested:
http://www.torontosun.com/2013/04/06/hundreds-arrested-at-montreal-protest

weefee 1 child; Glasgow, Î, United Kingdom 483 posts
Apr 10th '13

France is the land of protests. They still have strong trade unions and those trade unions protest constantly. I see them almost weekly, I particularly enjoyed an anti-meat eating one, as you can imagine in France there wsn't many people in attendance. There is generally a strong sense of civil solidarity in France so people tend to hold certain ideals of social justice dear and when these ideals are under attack they protest - not always succesfully or with any force. They also like to complain vocally lol



2006 was different because it was so disordered and so many cars etc were burnt. It's true that it was mainly kids and young adults from the 'banlieu' who rioted but I think it is unfair to dismiss it as purely uneducated kids.



The labour law would have afected them disproportionately, it is already extremely difficult to get a job if you're young and from the cit

TheNuge 1 child; Pennsylvania 23152 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" I'm watching a TV show on TruTV about violent protests and such. One was of the riot in France in 2006. ... [snip!] ... and b***h about things we don't like, but we never do anything about it. Are we afraid of our government? Are we just lazy?"</blockquote>




Mainly, we are uninformed. I suppose we are uninformed as we are lazy and apathetic. Also, we SLOWLY lose our freedoms so it gets less attention.



BTW, I don't think we should ever riot. Peaceful, productive protesting is more effective.
Occupy Wall Street was a laughable disaster.

Minion 3 kids; ., GA, United States 21802 posts
Apr 10th '13

<blockquote><b>Quoting TheNuge:</b>" <blockquote><b>Quoting Minion:</b>" I'm watching a TV show on TruTV about violent protests ... [snip!] ... think we should ever riot. Peaceful, productive protesting is more effective. Occupy Wall Street was a laughable disaster."</blockquote>




Idk. I think rioting would be ok if the government seriously overstepped their bounds and peaceful protesting didn't work.
I can't think of an example ATM. Lol.